Topeka murder was over terms of lease

Topeka murder was over terms of lease
Anthony Darcy

I previously posted about the murder of Stephen Snyder in Topeka, Kansas, here. At the time I wondered if it was yet another craigslist killing since Snyder bought the house from his alleged killer on craigslist. While the purchase of the house through craigslist has been confirmed, craigslist had nothing to do with the murder.

Recently, an affidavit was made public that detailed what police believe to be the actual motive behind the murder. Mr. Snyder did indeed buy the house 81-year-old Anthony Darcy was living in. Mr. Snyder allowed Darcy to live in the house for two weeks providing Snyder could come to the house when he wanted in order to make preparations for moving in.

On the day before the sale, Darcy presented a lease without the language allowing the buyers to visit the house. The buyers didn’t sign that lease, and Darcy, who wasn’t “happy about them wanting to paint some rooms in the house,” indicated he might back out of the deal, the affidavit said.

But during the sale, Darcy “had not complained” about the buyers visiting the house, the affidavit said.

On the day of the shooting, Snyder approached the house with his 8-year-old son when Darcy is said to have opened fire on Snyder. Darcy was said to have called 911 and told dispatchers he shot Snyder because “he was tired of his (expletive).” Darcy then reportedly placed the gun on the kitchen counter and waited for police.

Even I’m a little shocked at the callousness of Mr. Snyder’s murder. Not only did Darcy murder a man over something so petty as being annoyed over a house visit, but he did it in front of Mr. Snyder’s 8-year-old son, putting the child in potential danger as well. Some may say the prosecution should go easy on Darcy since he’s an 81-year-old man with no criminal record. I disagree. While he may have waited late in life to commit a crime, he committed one of the most heinous crimes one can commit. Because of that he deserves to be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.

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